Tagged: Reviews

At Harrods, Vetements Calls Out The Fashion Industry On Overproduction

Unveiled today, Vetements is taking over four Harrods windows to create awareness around the corporate overproduction the brand’s co-founder Guram Gvasalia says is destroying fashion and its surrounding world.

TRUST Vetements and the brand’s cultish cool to tackle the touchy subject of overproduction heads on. Launching today, four of Harrods’ store windows on Brompton Road will be dedicated to the Swiss label’s call for action. “We have the luxury of being a young, independent brand, which has the opportunity to speak out without being afraid of powerful backers,” its CEO Guram Gvasalia says over coffee in the suite of his Mayfair hotel. “The problem with sustainability today is that people look at it from the wrong perspective. Yes, where you produce and how you produce is super important. But what people are overseeing is something that’s right in front of our eyes: it’s about how much brands produce and how much consumers buy,” the 31-year-old brother of Vetements’ creative director Demna Gvasalia argues. “Since my first-ever interview I’ve been saying this: the basic thing of economics is the supply meeting demand. If you go to a shop and you see something on sale, it means it’s been overproduced.”

Over the past year, Vetements has been highlighting issues of overconsumption, staging waste-focused events at Maxfield in Los Angeles, Saks Fifth Avenue in New York, and Browns East in London. “But in this age, doing something once or twice isn’t enough. Our phone screens refresh so quickly that our attention spans have shrunk,” Gvasalia quips. He’s devoted the next twelve months to shining a light on the issue of overproduction with plans of fifty events worldwide starting with the windows at Harrods. Unveiled to the public this morning, they feature stockpile installations of clothes donated by Harrods’ four-thousand employees as well as original Parisian donation bins for charity, a regular occurrence on Instagram due to the “Vetements” logo featured on their fronts (simply meaning ‘clothes’). Throughout February, Harrods’ customers are invited to donate their own garments, the proceeds of which go to the NSPPC.

Gvaslia, who has been working on the projects for over a year, says he approached all the big fashion brands asking them to donate their stock. “Nobody wanted to take part. Not a single brand; really huge corporations. Everyone is afraid of admitting that they make more clothes than they can sell.” He spends his year travelling the world, trawling through department stores and boutiques, analysing the stock on display at various points of the season. “I find it particularly hard travelling in the United States during the sale, seeing all these luxury items on extreme discount,” he says. “There are mountains and mountains of clothes that were overproduced. Part of it is sold with huge markdowns, but what’s left becomes dead-stock. Statistically, thirty percent of what brands produce ends up in landfills. Garbage.”

What needs to change, Gvasalia explains, is the pride of the biggest companies in fashion, whose reported gross turnovers can only increase if they sell more merchandise. “At the end of the day, you only have a certain amount of people, who are actually willing to buy your clothes. No matter what you do, this number is limited. So instead, they have their own stores that they force their merchandise upon, just so they can increase their numbers.” In other words, the annual figures reported in designer interviews and reviews shouldn’t always be taken for granted. Nor should they necessarily be a source of pride. “For brands to become more sustainable today, they need to do one simple thing: have their supply meet their demand. It’s like throwing away food in a world full of hunger. Our planet is sick because of us, because we want more and more and more, without thinking of generations to come,” he reflects. And it goes for the customer, too. “Try to think, ‘Do I need all these clothes?’”

Gvasalia isn’t a big shopper himself. On this day – as any – he’s clad in his trusty uniform of all-blacks: jeans, a T-shirt and a hoodie. His wardrobe can be counted on a few hands, and whenever he acquires a new item of clothing he donates an old one to a relative. Asked if he publicises Vetements’ turnovers he rolls his eyes. “Of course not. It’s not the main goal. The goal is to create amazing clothes for people who want to buy them.” How do he and his designer brother take responsibility, then? “First of all we don’t have our own stores. Secondly, we don’t push stores with minimums. We’ve started to limit quantities,” Gvasalia says, admitting he sometimes puts a stop to buyers when they try to buy stock beyond their customer demand. “Of course, there are buyers that are amazing. Natalie Kingham bought 250 of our unicorn hoodies,” he says, referring to the buying director of MatchesFashion.com, “and they were gone in a day. But some buyers put debts on pieces that are just insane.”

What of all those coveted, perpetually sold-out it-items we hear about, then? “What brands do – which is very smart – is to limit the online stores, giving one store maybe forty pairs of the hottest sneaker. So of course it sells out,” Gvasalia explains. “I sold four-thousand pairs of sneakers on Ssense.com in four days, but this is not my goal anymore. It breeds greed. I’m not chasing numbers. I don’t need my company to be worth a billion. You can make money like that much more easily outside of fashion.” It’s perhaps an easy thing to say for the owner of a brand like Vetements, which sky-rocketed in sales just a year into their existence, in 2014, shifting hoodies at £600 and denim trousers – sustainably made out of recycled jeans, by the way – at £1200. “Our stuff is expensive because it’s limited,” Gvasalia asserts. “But then people go and buy the high street items that look like our work. I want to tell people: buy less, buy quality and buy long term.”

Last year, Vetements relocated their studios from Paris to Zurich in a move interpreted by some as tax conscious. Gvasalia begs to differ. “We moved the company to Switzerland because I wanted to protect myself from an industry I feel is toxic and wrong. I don’t want to be distracted by the wrong business strategies. I moved the company because I wanted to be left alone in a world where we can operate without distractions.” So there. Vetements, of course, stills show in Paris, like in January when the brothers borrowed an old flea market free of charge and invited guests to watch the show – styled in copious layers as a reflection of overconsumption – from market chairs already in place. “My show was completely sustainable,” Gvasalia nods. He says his commendable outlook is the result of age, of running a growing business, but also rooted in a childhood of extremes

In the early 1990s, the brothers and their family fled their native Abkhazia amidst the Georgian civil war. “When you see stuff as six years old that I don’t even want to share as public knowledge, you start to appreciate life. You start to understand that if you have to cancel a T-shirt because of a minimum, you don’t have to care. It’s not the end of the world,” Gvasalia says, raising his eyebrows. “I appreciate life because I know that things can change in one second.”

Advertisements

Milan Fashion Week Men’s Street Style

Blac Chyna Poses in Pink Wig and Plunging Dress Amid Kardashian Lawsuit Drama

Hair color chameleon Blac Chyna has switched up her look yet again for an impromptu photoshoot in her own home.

The star is known to experiment with the boldest hair hues — even rainbow! — so it’s not surprising that only a few days into 2018, she’s giving baby pink a go. Chyna posed for a sultry photoshoot in her kitchen (because why not?) wearing a plunging, cleavage-revealing Fashion Nova dress and her millennial pink mane.

She didn’t keep the trendy hair color for long though. Soon after Chyna shared her sexy photos on Instagram, she posted another wearing a patterned bodycon Fashion Nova mini. But this time, she opted for a platinum blonde wig instead.

Blac Chyna/Instagram

Looking for more style content? Click here to subscribe to the PeopleStyle Newsletter for amazing shopping discounts, can’t-live-without beauty products and more.

Although her hairstyles don’t stay with her for long, Chyna’s lawsuit drama with the Kardashian family is continuing to follow her into the new year.

In October, Chyna filed a lawsuit against Rob Kardashian (the father of her 13-month-old daughter Dream) and his family alleging that he was damaging her brand and verbally and physically abusing her. But the Kardashians are fighting back.

Last week, Kris JennerKim Kardashian and Rob’s attorneys filed a “demurrer” objecting to and asking for a dismissal of Chyna’s lawsuit against them, in which the mother of two claimed the Kardashians were responsible for E! not moving forward with the planned second season of Rob & Chyna.

RELATED PHOTOS: UPDATED! Here’s All of the Inspiration You Need Before Dyeing Your Hair Pink

Soon after, court documents also revealed that Rob is denying all assault claimsalleged by Chyna, including that he grabbed “phone from her hand and violently knocked her to the ground where she landed on her hands and knees” and ransacked her closet. However, according to Rob’s statement, “She did not suffer any injury or harm as a result of any conduct by [Kardashian].”

CENTRESTAGE: Wambui Mukenyi’s grand fashion launch on a plane

Celebrated Kenyan fashion designer and wedding connoisseur Wambui Mukenyi has unveiled her latest luxury bridal line, dubbed “Wambui Mukenyi Luxe”.

The event, unlike most others witnessed locally, happened on a “runway” 20,000 feet above sea level. The launch is apparently the first ever of its kind in Eastern, Western and Central Africa. The launch was an exclusive, invite-only affair and in partnership with Moët & Chandon.

Among invited guests were NTV‘s Kobi Kihara, model Pinky Ghelani, stylist Connie Aluoch, Couture‘s Olive Gachara, Kris Senanu and K24‘s Anjlee Gadhvi. They were served with free flowing champagne during the flight to Malindi and the experience extended to Diamonds Dream of Africa Beach Resort over an exquisite lunch.

“Well synchronised event, creative chic designs, great crowd and brilliant execution,” said Senanu, an entrepreneur and investor in the TV programme Lion’s Den.

16 BRIDAL GOWNS

According to Ms Mukenyi, Kenya is ready for luxury fashion. “Growing demand and support from our customers is the main reason we unveiled Wambui Mukenyi Luxe, ” she said, adding, “The miles-high launch was to signify the leaps that the brand is making. From Kenya to the world, by bringing the best of Kenya to the rest of the world. Making great strides together with partners who believe in us, like Moët & Chandon, and our consumers who trust us to take the journey together.”

Every collection showed the designer’s love for luxurious fabric, while at the same time instilling her African heritage to produce timeless, feminine pieces. The dresses, in particularly, stand out because of the statement they make. They have a contemporary and elegant edge perfect for today’s modern woman that needs to be unique without making too much effort.

During the unveiling, 16 bridal pieces were showcased. The first catwalk was in the plane, which saw the models display the four designs. The collection featured elegant and trendy pieces, each of them an easy fit with the power to make an ordinary woman feel and look stylish.

On landing in Malindi, the models took turns to showcase the rest of the designer’s work on the beach. Wambui admitted that it was not easy and that she wanted to do something that has not been done here before; to test unchartered waters. “This was a good experience. I showcased the new designs that are definitely going to take wedding gowns to the next level.”

SAMANTHA’S BRIDAL SHOW

“The feminine gowns are carefully made with every bride in mind. This is showcased by the daring, strapless necklines, complemented by delicately boned bodices that are reminiscent of Victorian corsetry,” she said.

The shy and soft-spoken mother of one has an eye for detail, perfect designs, fabric choices and silhouettes, while at the same time guaranteeing her clients’ style and confidence on their big day. She embraces both classic and new styles, which are effortlessly eye catching and capture many a bride’s fantasies.

Founded in 2009, the Wambui Mukenyi label is the brainchild of the self-taught designer. She joined fashion company JF Fashions as a finance intern, but her destiny twirled on the wheel of fortune, resting on fashion and design.

Ms Wambui began by making custom-made pieces for her clients in 2009, before she branched out to wedding gowns and ready-to-wear clothes full of creativity and style. Her big break came later in the year when her products were used by the cast of Shuga, a drama series themed on love, sex and money. Since then, demand for her label has been soaring. Her pieces have been featured in prestigious fashion magazines in Kenya.

In 2012, Wambui participated in Samantha’s Bridal Show and The Hub of Africa Fashion Week. She described the fashion week in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, as a learning experience. In the same year, she collaborated with media personality Janet Mbugua to launch the Janet Collection, which boasts 20 designs.

Together they came up with designs that Ms Mbugua would be able to wear while travelling and for other formal occasions. Ms Wambui helped bring the combined ideas to life. Asked what is next for her, she said: “All we can say is, this is just the beginning. Stay with us, grow with us, and you shall see what awaits”.

North Shore shines at New Zealand Fashion Week

Teenagers from Auckland’s North Shore took centre stage at New Zealand Fashion Week (NZFW) 2017.

The YMCA North Shore Raise Up crew made up of 18 people aged 13 to 18 years-old ran the NZFW show Walk the Line.

Held on September 2 at the ANZ Viaduct Events Centre, Walk the Line is an opportunity to showcase youth and their talent.

Open Design winner Mirene Castelltort and her model Sabrina Brunton.

Fleur Mealing/Stuff

Open Design winner Mirene Castelltort and her model Sabrina Brunton.

Beginning five years ago, the show also gives the teenagers in youth development programme the opportunity to learn practical life skills they can take into the work force.

READ MORE:
Teen showcases design at New Zealand Fashion Week
Street style trends spotted at New Zealand Fashion Week
Fashion-forward teen wins judge’s hearts

Crew member Mitzi O’Brien​ said she was pleased to see all their hard work finally come to fruition.

High Fashion winner Jemma Botterill and her model Bella.

Fleur Mealing/Stuff

High Fashion winner Jemma Botterill and her model Bella.

“It has been really beneficial to gain event management experience and skills,” she said.

Fellow crew member Udayan Basu​ said it was not only a good experience for the Raise Up crew but it was also great for the entrants.

“It allows people from year 9 to 13 to showcase their works that they have done through school,”

“It gives them a chance to get a bit of a taste of what they might see or what might happen if they go into the fashion industry,” Basu explained.

The sentiment was shared by YMCA community development manager Kev Carter, who was on hand in the unlikely occasion something wrong.

Carter said it was on the job training for the group who got to work closely with the NZFW team to see how they do things. He also applauded them for their effort.

“I think it is the best show we have had so far, it was really smooth. All the young people did amazing,” said Carter.

Among the show’s entrants were many designers from the North Shore. Two Carmel College students won prizes on the day for their designs.

Mirene Castelltort​, who was also a member of the Raise Up crew, won the Open Division category for her colourful bodysuit-hoodie combo.

Meanwhile Jemma Botterill​ won the High Fashion division for her unisex Gucci-inspired pant suit.

Botterill who wanted to pursue a career in fashion entered as she said the show was a great opportunity to get your name out there as a designer.

Short, sweet and budget-friendly first time round to coats and cover-ups for number two: From High Street to designer, the Duchess of Cambridge’s pregnancy fashion

Pity the poor mothers at Thomas’s Battersea, where Prince George starts school on Thursday — all those months spent building a paparazzi-worthy wardrobe ready for the Big Day.

But now the news of Kate’s third pregnancy has put a right royal spanner in the works. Will the Duchess, who suffers from severe morning sickness, even turn up at the chic London day school?

But the Thomas’s mothers need not worry. Their carefully chosen and hugely expensive ‘posh mummy’ designer loot will not go to waste.

Short, sweet and budget-friendly first time round

Dec 2012: No bump and a neat Diane von Furstenberg coat

Jan 2013: A flowing Whistles dress hides any tell-tale signs

The Duchess opts for a Max Mara wrap dress

No bump and a neat Diane von Furstenberg coat, left, a flowing Whistles dress hides any tell-tale signs in January 2013, centre and the Duchess opts for a Max Mara wrap dress

March: An Emilia Wickstead coat for St Patrick’s Day

Looking peachy in a short Tara Jarmon outfit in April

March: An Emilia Wickstead coat for St Patrick’s Day, left, while she looked peachy in a short Tara Jarmon outfit in April

Emilia Wickstead again for an elegant April reception

May: Short Topshop dress proves a wedding bloomer

Emilia Wickstead coat for a spring royal garden party

Emilia Wickstead again for an elegant April reception, left, a short Topshop dress proves a wedding bloomer and another Emilia Wickstead coat for a spring royal garden party

June: In the pink and elegant for Trooping the Colour

July 23: New mum Kate leaves hospital in Jenny Packham

June: In the pink and elegant for Trooping the Colour while new mum Kate leaves hospital in Jenny Packham

In fact, judging by the Duchess’s new love of top-end fashion, they’ll need every swanky label they can get their hands on.

Take her most recent public appearance before her happy news was announced. While she was happy to wear an ‘austerity’ mix of High Street and affordable designer labels for her first two pregnancies, this time Kate stepped out in £1,420 worth of silk poppy-print Prada.

One can only imagine the panic that outfit caused at the school gate.

Since her first pregnancy in 2012/13, the Duchess has worn an increasingly sophisticated maternity wardrobe.

As a first-time mother, she made the classic mistake of assuming that standard clothes, which looked fine in the first trimester, could cope with a burgeoning bump. Take that unfortunate £38 polka dot Topshop dress and a £17.50 ASOS wrap dress: both rode up too high, revealing more leg than was decorous.

By her second pregnancy in 2014/15, the Duchess had learned her lesson — binning the cheap, off-the-peg frocks and upgrading to purpose-made maternity dresses from the affordable UK label Seraphine.

Coats and sophisticated cover-ups for number two

Oct 2014: Striking in mint Jenny Packham gown

Autumn, and a tailored Katherine Hooker dress

Striking in mint Jenny Packham gown while later in Autmn she opted for a tailored Katherine Hooker dress

Jan 2015: A softly styled coat by Seraphine

Well wrapped for winter in Max Mara

March: Pink Alexander McQueen coat (again)

Jan 2015: A softly styled coat by Seraphine, left while Kate was well wrapped for winter in Max Mara, centre. She went for her Pink Alexander McQueen coat again in March

Stand-out Hobbs coat for spring art exhibition

Elegant bump in dark Beulah London coat

A stand-out Hobbs coat for a spring art exhibition while her bump looks elegant in a dark Beulah London coat

Catherine Walker coat for St Patrick’s Day

Statement fuchsia coat by Mulberry at eight months

Charlotte is born: Going home in Jenny Packham

A Catherine Walker coat for St Patrick’s Day, left,a statement fuchsia coat by Mulberry at eight months, centre and going home in Jenny Packham after Charlotte is born

It also helped that in much of the later stages of her second pregnancy, Kate was dressing for winter and could turn to cashmere and wool frock coats from Hobbs, Mulberry and another fashionable label, Goat — tailored enough to give her shape yet voluminous enough to cover her bump. For evening, she discovered the joys of an empire-line dress — in particular an ink-blue silk gown from Jenny Packham, which skimmed over her bump.

So what will the Duchess be wearing third time around? Her favourite designer, Sarah Burton, creative director of Alexander McQueen, has no doubt been beavering away on bespoke maternity pieces.

Ever since she designed the Duchess’s wedding dress, the pair have been as thick as thieves, creating an elegant wardrobe for many of Kate’s biggest events. It helps that last year Sarah gave birth to twins, so she intimately understands the sartorial issues that come with pregnancy.

We can also expect to see the Duchess recycling some of her more successful pregnancy pieces, from the fuchsia Mulberry coat to her pale pink Alexander McQueen. Expect also to see a flash of Emilia Wickstead, the Tatler crowd’s designer of choice, and British designer Erdem.

But judging from the Duchess’s recent appearance in Prada — one of the most expensive, high-fashion labels in Milan — we could also expect to see a smattering of international bombshell frocks.

And that will certainly be enough to make the ground shake in Battersea.

 

DEALMAN

Tommy Hilfiger Taps Shawn Yue as Men’s Ambassador in Asia

Actor Shawn Yue will appear as the first local brand ambassador for Tommy Hilfiger men’s wear in China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan for fall 2017 and spring 2018.

The exclusive partnership reflects Hilfiger’s continued commitment to expand in Asia, its fastest-growing region. The campaign goes live Friday.

“We’ve seen exciting growth in both the overall business and brand awareness in China over the past few years. Our partnership with Shawn will solidify our position in the market and introduce our men’s wear business to a new consumer,” Tommy Hilfiger said Wednesday.

“He is at the center of pop culture in China, known for his incredible talent and is celebrated by young fashion followers across Asia for his cool, sophisticated style. He truly is a reflection of today’s Tommy Guy,” he added.

Asia is a key market for Hilfiger, which it entered in 2002 as one of the first premium designer brands. The company’s overall business in China, including e-commerce and stores, increased 14 percent in 2016. The brand has expanded its current store count to 357 from 100 stores in 2011. By year-end, Hilfiger expects to have 405 stores. Having launched e-commerce in China in 2012, Hilfiger became one of the first international brands to directly launch and operate e-commerce successfully in China. E-commerce sales rose by 49 percent in 2016.

Hilfiger’s brand awareness in China has grown from 35 percent in 2010 to more than 55 percent in 2016. In 2015, Hilfiger re-created its American football-inspired fashion show in Beijing, a first for the brand, when the company celebrated its 30th anniversary. Last fall, Hilfiger toured Shanghai with Gigi Hadid, which was the company’s most engaging celebrity campaign to date. Content trended on the Tmall homepage for 96 hours.

For fall, Hilfiger’s print and digital campaign featuring Yue was photographed by Lachlan Bailey. The lifestyle campaign includes videos where Yue applies his twist to Hilfiger’s classic American style through the lens of his many personal passions, from basketball and sports cars to acting and music. The campaign launch will include video, print, online and out-of-home media placements.

“Tommy Hilfiger’s cool American spirit and unexpected twists have always inspired me,” said Yue, praising “the brand’s unique campaigns and innovative experiences.”

Avery Baker, chief brand officer of Hilfiger, noted that Yue is extremely influential in China, especially with Millennials. “He’s incredibly talented as an actor and a musician, and a race car enthusiast. He has great style. He has a zest for life and has achieved a lot in his career,” she said. She described Yue’s role as “the face of the brand in China,” and said he was photographed wearing the global men’s collection.

“We really wanted to put the spotlight on the men’s business. We have a strong men’s wear business already to date, but wanted to use this opportunity to bring new fans to the brand and reach that Millennial customer,” Baker said.

The 35-year-old Yue has more than 13 million followers on Weibo and over three million on Instagram. He began his career as a model before garnering fame in Hong Kong cinema. He was awarded “Best Actor” at the South Korea Bucheon International Fantastic Film Festival in 2008, and most recently starred in “Love Off the Cuff” and “The Tales of Wukong.” He ha also gained international fame for his music career, winning “Best New Male Artist” at the RTHK Top 10 Gold Songs Awards in 2002.

In recent years, Hilfiger has had partnerships with Rafael Nadal (which just ended); Hadid (which runs through spring 2018), and DJ/producer duo The Chainsmokers, who will appear in Hilfiger’s global campaign (including China) and will be attending the designer’s upcoming fashion show in London. Yue’s campaign is specific to China and “will be an extra level of investment,” Baker said.

Actor Shawn Yue will appear as the first local brand ambassador for Tommy Hilfiger men’s wear in China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan for fall 2017 and spring 2018.

The exclusive partnership reflects Hilfiger’s continued commitment to expand in Asia, its fastest-growing region. The campaign goes live Friday.

“We’ve seen exciting growth in both the overall business and brand awareness in China over the past few years. Our partnership with Shawn will solidify our position in the market and introduce our men’s wear business to a new consumer,” Tommy Hilfiger said Wednesday.

“He is at the center of pop culture in China, known for his incredible talent and is celebrated by young fashion followers across Asia for his cool, sophisticated style. He truly is a reflection of today’s Tommy Guy,” he added.

Asia is a key market for Hilfiger, which it entered in 2002 as one of the first premium designer brands. The company’s overall business in China, including e-commerce and stores, increased 14 percent in 2016. The brand has expanded its current store count to 357 from 100 stores in 2011. By year-end, Hilfiger expects to have 405 stores. Having launched e-commerce in China in 2012, Hilfiger became one of the first international brands to directly launch and operate e-commerce successfully in China. E-commerce sales rose by 49 percent in 2016.

Hilfiger’s brand awareness in China has grown from 35 percent in 2010 to more than 55 percent in 2016. In 2015, Hilfiger re-created its American football-inspired fashion show in Beijing, a first for the brand, when the company celebrated its 30th anniversary. Last fall, Hilfiger toured Shanghai with Gigi Hadid, which was the company’s most engaging celebrity campaign to date. Content trended on the Tmall homepage for 96 hours.

For fall, Hilfiger’s print and digital campaign featuring Yue was photographed by Lachlan Bailey. The lifestyle campaign includes videos where Yue applies his twist to Hilfiger’s classic American style through the lens of his many personal passions, from basketball and sports cars to acting and music. The campaign launch will include video, print, online and out-of-home media placements.

“Tommy Hilfiger’s cool American spirit and unexpected twists have always inspired me,” said Yue, praising “the brand’s unique campaigns and innovative experiences.”

Avery Baker, chief brand officer of Hilfiger, noted that Yue is extremely influential in China, especially with Millennials. “He’s incredibly talented as an actor and a musician, and a race car enthusiast. He has great style. He has a zest for life and has achieved a lot in his career,” she said. She described Yue’s role as “the face of the brand in China,” and said he was photographed wearing the global men’s collection.

“We really wanted to put the spotlight on the men’s business. We have a strong men’s wear business already to date, but wanted to use this opportunity to bring new fans to the brand and reach that Millennial customer,” Baker said.

The 35-year-old Yue has more than 13 million followers on Weibo and over three million on Instagram. He began his career as a model before garnering fame in Hong Kong cinema. He was awarded “Best Actor” at the South Korea Bucheon International Fantastic Film Festival in 2008, and most recently starred in “Love Off the Cuff” and “The Tales of Wukong.” He ha also gained international fame for his music career, winning “Best New Male Artist” at the RTHK Top 10 Gold Songs Awards in 2002.

In recent years, Hilfiger has had partnerships with Rafael Nadal (which just ended); Hadid (which runs through spring 2018), and DJ/producer duo The Chainsmokers, who will appear in Hilfiger’s global campaign (including China) and will be attending the designer’s upcoming fashion show in London. Yue’s campaign is specific to China and “will be an extra level of investment,” Baker said.

Actor Shawn Yue will appear as the first local brand ambassador for Tommy Hilfiger men’s wear in China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan for fall 2017 and spring 2018.

The exclusive partnership reflects Hilfiger’s continued commitment to expand in Asia, its fastest-growing region. The campaign goes live Friday.

“We’ve seen exciting growth in both the overall business and brand awareness in China over the past few years. Our partnership with Shawn will solidify our position in the market and introduce our men’s wear business to a new consumer,” Tommy Hilfiger said Wednesday.

“He is at the center of pop culture in China, known for his incredible talent and is celebrated by young fashion followers across Asia for his cool, sophisticated style. He truly is a reflection of today’s Tommy Guy,” he added.

Asia is a key market for Hilfiger, which it entered in 2002 as one of the first premium designer brands. The company’s overall business in China, including e-commerce and stores, increased 14 percent in 2016. The brand has expanded its current store count to 357 from 100 stores in 2011. By year-end, Hilfiger expects to have 405 stores. Having launched e-commerce in China in 2012, Hilfiger became one of the first international brands to directly launch and operate e-commerce successfully in China. E-commerce sales rose by 49 percent in 2016.

Hilfiger’s brand awareness in China has grown from 35 percent in 2010 to more than 55 percent in 2016. In 2015, Hilfiger re-created its American football-inspired fashion show in Beijing, a first for the brand, when the company celebrated its 30th anniversary. Last fall, Hilfiger toured Shanghai with Gigi Hadid, which was the company’s most engaging celebrity campaign to date. Content trended on the Tmall homepage for 96 hours.

For fall, Hilfiger’s print and digital campaign featuring Yue was photographed by Lachlan Bailey. The lifestyle campaign includes videos where Yue applies his twist to Hilfiger’s classic American style through the lens of his many personal passions, from basketball and sports cars to acting and music. The campaign launch will include video, print, online and out-of-home media placements.

“Tommy Hilfiger’s cool American spirit and unexpected twists have always inspired me,” said Yue, praising “the brand’s unique campaigns and innovative experiences.”

Avery Baker, chief brand officer of Hilfiger, noted that Yue is extremely influential in China, especially with Millennials. “He’s incredibly talented as an actor and a musician, and a race car enthusiast. He has great style. He has a zest for life and has achieved a lot in his career,” she said. She described Yue’s role as “the face of the brand in China,” and said he was photographed wearing the global men’s collection.

“We really wanted to put the spotlight on the men’s business. We have a strong men’s wear business already to date, but wanted to use this opportunity to bring new fans to the brand and reach that Millennial customer,” Baker said.

The 35-year-old Yue has more than 13 million followers on Weibo and over three million on Instagram. He began his career as a model before garnering fame in Hong Kong cinema. He was awarded “Best Actor” at the South Korea Bucheon International Fantastic Film Festival in 2008, and most recently starred in “Love Off the Cuff” and “The Tales of Wukong.” He ha also gained international fame for his music career, winning “Best New Male Artist” at the RTHK Top 10 Gold Songs Awards in 2002.

In recent years, Hilfiger has had partnerships with Rafael Nadal (which just ended); Hadid (which runs through spring 2018), and DJ/producer duo The Chainsmokers, who will appear in Hilfiger’s global campaign (including China) and will be attending the designer’s upcoming fashion show in London. Yue’s campaign is specific to China and “will be an extra level of investment,” Baker said.

Actor Shawn Yue will appear as the first local brand ambassador for Tommy Hilfiger men’s wear in China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan for fall 2017 and spring 2018.

The exclusive partnership reflects Hilfiger’s continued commitment to expand in Asia, its fastest-growing region. The campaign goes live Friday.

“We’ve seen exciting growth in both the overall business and brand awareness in China over the past few years. Our partnership with Shawn will solidify our position in the market and introduce our men’s wear business to a new consumer,” Tommy Hilfiger said Wednesday.

“He is at the center of pop culture in China, known for his incredible talent and is celebrated by young fashion followers across Asia for his cool, sophisticated style. He truly is a reflection of today’s Tommy Guy,” he added.

Asia is a key market for Hilfiger, which it entered in 2002 as one of the first premium designer brands. The company’s overall business in China, including e-commerce and stores, increased 14 percent in 2016. The brand has expanded its current store count to 357 from 100 stores in 2011. By year-end, Hilfiger expects to have 405 stores. Having launched e-commerce in China in 2012, Hilfiger became one of the first international brands to directly launch and operate e-commerce successfully in China. E-commerce sales rose by 49 percent in 2016.

Hilfiger’s brand awareness in China has grown from 35 percent in 2010 to more than 55 percent in 2016. In 2015, Hilfiger re-created its American football-inspired fashion show in Beijing, a first for the brand, when the company celebrated its 30th anniversary. Last fall, Hilfiger toured Shanghai with Gigi Hadid, which was the company’s most engaging celebrity campaign to date. Content trended on the Tmall homepage for 96 hours.

For fall, Hilfiger’s print and digital campaign featuring Yue was photographed by Lachlan Bailey. The lifestyle campaign includes videos where Yue applies his twist to Hilfiger’s classic American style through the lens of his many personal passions, from basketball and sports cars to acting and music. The campaign launch will include video, print, online and out-of-home media placements.

“Tommy Hilfiger’s cool American spirit and unexpected twists have always inspired me,” said Yue, praising “the brand’s unique campaigns and innovative experiences.”

Avery Baker, chief brand officer of Hilfiger, noted that Yue is extremely influential in China, especially with Millennials. “He’s incredibly talented as an actor and a musician, and a race car enthusiast. He has great style. He has a zest for life and has achieved a lot in his career,” she said. She described Yue’s role as “the face of the brand in China,” and said he was photographed wearing the global men’s collection.

“We really wanted to put the spotlight on the men’s business. We have a strong men’s wear business already to date, but wanted to use this opportunity to bring new fans to the brand and reach that Millennial customer,” Baker said.

The 35-year-old Yue has more than 13 million followers on Weibo and over three million on Instagram. He began his career as a model before garnering fame in Hong Kong cinema. He was awarded “Best Actor” at the South Korea Bucheon International Fantastic Film Festival in 2008, and most recently starred in “Love Off the Cuff” and “The Tales of Wukong.” He ha also gained international fame for his music career, winning “Best New Male Artist” at the RTHK Top 10 Gold Songs Awards in 2002.

In recent years, Hilfiger has had partnerships with Rafael Nadal (which just ended); Hadid (which runs through spring 2018), and DJ/producer duo The Chainsmokers, who will appear in Hilfiger’s global campaign (including China) and will be attending the designer’s upcoming fashion show in London. Yue’s campaign is specific to China and “will be an extra level of investment,” Baker said.

DEALMAN