Tagged: Dresses

At Harrods, Vetements Calls Out The Fashion Industry On Overproduction

Unveiled today, Vetements is taking over four Harrods windows to create awareness around the corporate overproduction the brand’s co-founder Guram Gvasalia says is destroying fashion and its surrounding world.

TRUST Vetements and the brand’s cultish cool to tackle the touchy subject of overproduction heads on. Launching today, four of Harrods’ store windows on Brompton Road will be dedicated to the Swiss label’s call for action. “We have the luxury of being a young, independent brand, which has the opportunity to speak out without being afraid of powerful backers,” its CEO Guram Gvasalia says over coffee in the suite of his Mayfair hotel. “The problem with sustainability today is that people look at it from the wrong perspective. Yes, where you produce and how you produce is super important. But what people are overseeing is something that’s right in front of our eyes: it’s about how much brands produce and how much consumers buy,” the 31-year-old brother of Vetements’ creative director Demna Gvasalia argues. “Since my first-ever interview I’ve been saying this: the basic thing of economics is the supply meeting demand. If you go to a shop and you see something on sale, it means it’s been overproduced.”

Over the past year, Vetements has been highlighting issues of overconsumption, staging waste-focused events at Maxfield in Los Angeles, Saks Fifth Avenue in New York, and Browns East in London. “But in this age, doing something once or twice isn’t enough. Our phone screens refresh so quickly that our attention spans have shrunk,” Gvasalia quips. He’s devoted the next twelve months to shining a light on the issue of overproduction with plans of fifty events worldwide starting with the windows at Harrods. Unveiled to the public this morning, they feature stockpile installations of clothes donated by Harrods’ four-thousand employees as well as original Parisian donation bins for charity, a regular occurrence on Instagram due to the “Vetements” logo featured on their fronts (simply meaning ‘clothes’). Throughout February, Harrods’ customers are invited to donate their own garments, the proceeds of which go to the NSPPC.

Gvaslia, who has been working on the projects for over a year, says he approached all the big fashion brands asking them to donate their stock. “Nobody wanted to take part. Not a single brand; really huge corporations. Everyone is afraid of admitting that they make more clothes than they can sell.” He spends his year travelling the world, trawling through department stores and boutiques, analysing the stock on display at various points of the season. “I find it particularly hard travelling in the United States during the sale, seeing all these luxury items on extreme discount,” he says. “There are mountains and mountains of clothes that were overproduced. Part of it is sold with huge markdowns, but what’s left becomes dead-stock. Statistically, thirty percent of what brands produce ends up in landfills. Garbage.”

What needs to change, Gvasalia explains, is the pride of the biggest companies in fashion, whose reported gross turnovers can only increase if they sell more merchandise. “At the end of the day, you only have a certain amount of people, who are actually willing to buy your clothes. No matter what you do, this number is limited. So instead, they have their own stores that they force their merchandise upon, just so they can increase their numbers.” In other words, the annual figures reported in designer interviews and reviews shouldn’t always be taken for granted. Nor should they necessarily be a source of pride. “For brands to become more sustainable today, they need to do one simple thing: have their supply meet their demand. It’s like throwing away food in a world full of hunger. Our planet is sick because of us, because we want more and more and more, without thinking of generations to come,” he reflects. And it goes for the customer, too. “Try to think, ‘Do I need all these clothes?’”

Gvasalia isn’t a big shopper himself. On this day – as any – he’s clad in his trusty uniform of all-blacks: jeans, a T-shirt and a hoodie. His wardrobe can be counted on a few hands, and whenever he acquires a new item of clothing he donates an old one to a relative. Asked if he publicises Vetements’ turnovers he rolls his eyes. “Of course not. It’s not the main goal. The goal is to create amazing clothes for people who want to buy them.” How do he and his designer brother take responsibility, then? “First of all we don’t have our own stores. Secondly, we don’t push stores with minimums. We’ve started to limit quantities,” Gvasalia says, admitting he sometimes puts a stop to buyers when they try to buy stock beyond their customer demand. “Of course, there are buyers that are amazing. Natalie Kingham bought 250 of our unicorn hoodies,” he says, referring to the buying director of MatchesFashion.com, “and they were gone in a day. But some buyers put debts on pieces that are just insane.”

What of all those coveted, perpetually sold-out it-items we hear about, then? “What brands do – which is very smart – is to limit the online stores, giving one store maybe forty pairs of the hottest sneaker. So of course it sells out,” Gvasalia explains. “I sold four-thousand pairs of sneakers on Ssense.com in four days, but this is not my goal anymore. It breeds greed. I’m not chasing numbers. I don’t need my company to be worth a billion. You can make money like that much more easily outside of fashion.” It’s perhaps an easy thing to say for the owner of a brand like Vetements, which sky-rocketed in sales just a year into their existence, in 2014, shifting hoodies at £600 and denim trousers – sustainably made out of recycled jeans, by the way – at £1200. “Our stuff is expensive because it’s limited,” Gvasalia asserts. “But then people go and buy the high street items that look like our work. I want to tell people: buy less, buy quality and buy long term.”

Last year, Vetements relocated their studios from Paris to Zurich in a move interpreted by some as tax conscious. Gvasalia begs to differ. “We moved the company to Switzerland because I wanted to protect myself from an industry I feel is toxic and wrong. I don’t want to be distracted by the wrong business strategies. I moved the company because I wanted to be left alone in a world where we can operate without distractions.” So there. Vetements, of course, stills show in Paris, like in January when the brothers borrowed an old flea market free of charge and invited guests to watch the show – styled in copious layers as a reflection of overconsumption – from market chairs already in place. “My show was completely sustainable,” Gvasalia nods. He says his commendable outlook is the result of age, of running a growing business, but also rooted in a childhood of extremes

In the early 1990s, the brothers and their family fled their native Abkhazia amidst the Georgian civil war. “When you see stuff as six years old that I don’t even want to share as public knowledge, you start to appreciate life. You start to understand that if you have to cancel a T-shirt because of a minimum, you don’t have to care. It’s not the end of the world,” Gvasalia says, raising his eyebrows. “I appreciate life because I know that things can change in one second.”


Milan Fashion Week Men’s Street Style

Blac Chyna Poses in Pink Wig and Plunging Dress Amid Kardashian Lawsuit Drama

Hair color chameleon Blac Chyna has switched up her look yet again for an impromptu photoshoot in her own home.

The star is known to experiment with the boldest hair hues — even rainbow! — so it’s not surprising that only a few days into 2018, she’s giving baby pink a go. Chyna posed for a sultry photoshoot in her kitchen (because why not?) wearing a plunging, cleavage-revealing Fashion Nova dress and her millennial pink mane.

She didn’t keep the trendy hair color for long though. Soon after Chyna shared her sexy photos on Instagram, she posted another wearing a patterned bodycon Fashion Nova mini. But this time, she opted for a platinum blonde wig instead.

Blac Chyna/Instagram

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Although her hairstyles don’t stay with her for long, Chyna’s lawsuit drama with the Kardashian family is continuing to follow her into the new year.

In October, Chyna filed a lawsuit against Rob Kardashian (the father of her 13-month-old daughter Dream) and his family alleging that he was damaging her brand and verbally and physically abusing her. But the Kardashians are fighting back.

Last week, Kris JennerKim Kardashian and Rob’s attorneys filed a “demurrer” objecting to and asking for a dismissal of Chyna’s lawsuit against them, in which the mother of two claimed the Kardashians were responsible for E! not moving forward with the planned second season of Rob & Chyna.

RELATED PHOTOS: UPDATED! Here’s All of the Inspiration You Need Before Dyeing Your Hair Pink

Soon after, court documents also revealed that Rob is denying all assault claimsalleged by Chyna, including that he grabbed “phone from her hand and violently knocked her to the ground where she landed on her hands and knees” and ransacked her closet. However, according to Rob’s statement, “She did not suffer any injury or harm as a result of any conduct by [Kardashian].”


15 Chic Little Black Dresses For Under $100

Just in time for those holiday parties. Shopdealman Reviews

Just like your favorite suit or your luckiest jeans, the infamous little black dress is so much more than just a piece of fabric. It’s a power statement. But that doesn’t mean that a LBD should cost you an arm and a leg to feel like your best self.

That’s why we’ve rounded up 15 chic little black dresses that are all under $100, so you can save while still looking like a million bucks.

Whether you’re looking for some light ruching, lace, an A-line, or a sheath silhouette, we’ve got just the dress for you.


  • 1
    Chloe Mesh Sleeve Minidress


  • 2
    Kasi Ruffle Fit & Flare Dress


  • 3
    Side Button Ponte Sheath Dress


  • 4
    Scalloped Lace Sheath Dress


  • 5
    Asymmetrical Body-Con Dress


  • 6
    Drape Front Mock Neck Dress


  • 7
    Cap-Sleeve Fit & Flare Dress


  • 8
    Nordstrom Rack
    Button Down Front Tie Dress


  • 9
    Ruffle Off the Shoulder Body-Con Dress


  • 10
    Off-The-Shoulder Belted Dress


  • 11
    Scalloped Crepe Sheath Dress


  • 12
    Deep V-Neck A-Line Dress


  • 13
    Nordstrom Rack
    Asymmetrical Neck Sheath Dress


  • 14
    Choker Ribbed Bodycon Dress


  • 15


  • Halter Sweater Knit Dress

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