Tagged: deal man fashion

10 TIMES LADY KITTY SPENCER CHANNELED PRINCESS DIANA’S STYLE

As one of the most stylish women in history, it’s not surprise that Diana, Princess of Wales, continues to offer fashion inspiration for other royals the world over.

In fact, we’ve lost count of how many times Diana’s daughters-in-law, the Duchess of Cambridge, Kate Middleton, and The Duchess of Sussex, Meghan Markle, have paid sartorial tribute to the fashion icon.

Now it appears another young royal has chosen Diana as their style muse: her niece, Lady Kitty Spencer.

In case you haven’t heard of Kitty, she’s rapidly becoming fashion’s new darling after landing campaigns with brands like Dolce & Gabbana and Bvlgari.

Here we chart every time Kitty Spencer channeled her late aunt, Princess Diana’s style.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Pippa Middleton’s royal wedding dress draws Arizona iced tea comparisons

Pippa Middleton’s royal wedding dress draws Arizona iced tea comparisons

Pippa Middleton arrived at St. George’s Chapel for Saturday’s royal wedding in a $695 green-and-pink floral dress by British brand The Fold.

But while her look fit right in with the ceremony’s unofficial color palette —  both Queen Elizabeth II and Meghan Markle’s mother, Doria Ragland, also wore shades of green — Middleton, 34, is drawing some rather uncanny comparisons on social media, due to her dress’s striking resemblance to a container of Arizona iced tea.

View image on Twitter

Sarah Rogers

@sarahnrogers

Pippa’s dress looks like the Arizona iced tea can #RoyalWedding

View image on Twitter

Spooky Island@dimiginger_mars

Pippa Middleton sponsored by Arizona #RoyalWedding (credit to my father)

Kate Middleton’s younger sister is pregnant with her first child, and will celebrate her first anniversary with husband James Matthews on Sunday.

How Meghan’s reception dress compared to Kate’s

After a wedding speech by Harry that guests said moved people to tears, the new Duke and Duchess of Sussex travelled to their evening reception at Frogmore House.

Meghan changed from her Clare Waight Keller ceremony gown into a soft white bespoke halter neck dress by Stella McCartney, made of silk crepe. Harry swapped his military uniform for a black tuxedo.

How Meghan's reception dress compared to Kate's
PA

Kensington Palace said: ‘The Bride is wearing shoes from Aquazzura made in silky satin, with nude mesh, with soles painted in baby blue.’

George Northwood styled her hair, into an updo again, but this time more relaxed.

The second dress was a hit on Twitter, with some saying it was even better than Meghan’s first gown.

How Meghan's reception dress compared to Kate's
PA
There was a lot of speculation as to whether the ceremony dress would be by Stella McCartney.

Meghan is known to be a fan of the ethical British designer, she wore one of the designers dresses last month.

The dress was in line with Meghan’s simple, sleek style of her first dress, with a completely different neckline.

Enormous trains make cutting shapes on the dance floor pretty difficult so it’s standard for royal brides to change into a second dress later in the day.

Kate swapped her Sarah Burton for Alexander McQueen wedding gown for a simpler dress for her evening reception in 2011.

How Meghan's reception dress compared to Kate's
PA

But while Kate went for ivory satin for her second gown of the day, also by Sarah Burton, Meghan stuck with white, ‘lily white’ according to Kensington Palace.

Kate’s neckline was sweetheart, a classic in bridal wear, while Meghan’s high halter neckline is a bit more edgy and modern while still having a thoroughly regal feel to it.

Meghan kept it as plain as her first dress, but Kate’s Burton gown said ‘evening party’ in a different way, with a bit of sparkle in the embellished waistline.

How Meghan's reception dress compared to Kate's
PA

Kate’s style is pretty demure so it was no surprise that she covered her shoulders and arms with a white angora bolero cardigan.

Meghan’s second dress though was all about her shoulders and arms.

Harry drove his new wife in a silver blue Jaguar E-Type Concept Zero with the number plate E190518, the date of their wedding.

Has Prince Harry’s Stag Do Venue Been Revealed?

© Shutterstock

 

With the royal wedding a matter of weeks away, preparations for Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s nuptials have stepped up a gear – and yes, that means that the planning for Prince Harry’s stag do is well under way.

According to a new report in Vanity Fair from Katie Nicholl, who recently authored the new biography Harry: Life, Loss and Love, the Prince has asked his brother William and best friend Tom Inskip to over-see the arrangements, with the latter tasked with finding a suitable location for the festivities.

Tom, who is known as ‘Skippy’ amongst his friends, was apparently spotted at a boutique hotel in Mexico last week, which could prove a potential venue for the event.

‘Tom is in charge of finding the location,’ a source told Vanity Fair, explaining that the Prince has a specific set of criteria. ‘It has to be somewhere they won’t be found and a place they can completely take over,’ they said. ‘Tom was checking out this fabulous place in Mexico last week and he loved it. It might be a step too far for everyone to go to Mexico but it’s one of the places on the wish list.’

William, meanwhile, has reportedly been asked to ensure that things don’t get too wild. ‘Harry is a lot tamer and less of a party boy these days,’ a further source told the magazine. ‘Meghan has really calmed him down. He smokes less, although Meghan hasn’t yet managed to get him to quit smoking. And he doesn’t drink as much. He’s determined that there will be no repeats of Vegas on this stag do.’ Though William previously joked that his younger brother ‘hadn’t asked him‘ to be best man, we can safely assume that he will play an important part in wedding preparations.

While it was previously reported that Meghan enjoyed a low-key hen do at Soho Farmhouse at the start of March, it seems that was just a pre-amble. The royal-to-be has apparently enlisted her friend Markus Anderson to plan her event. ‘It is going to be fabulous, glamorous and every exclusive,’ a source close to the Soho House consultant revealed. ‘Marcus knows some wonderful venues, [but] saying that, I bet he’ll keep it simple and close to home.’

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle met in London in July 2016.

 

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle

Fashion: Put it all on diamonds

HyperFocal: 0

From left: 18-carat white gold and diamond ring, £9,600, Chanel. White gold and diamond bracelet, £153,200, Van Cleef & Arpels. White gold and diamond ring, £34,700, Dior Joaillerie. White gold and diamond necklace, £66,600, Chaumet. Titanium, sapphire and diamond earrings, price on application, Adler. Muse morganite and 0.35-carat pave diamond earrings, £7,000, and snowflake 1.48-carat diamond cluster stud earrings, £6,500, both Birks, from Mappin & Webb. Pearl necklace, £2,190, Mikimoto. Snowflake crown diamond necklace, £108,000, Birks. White gold, black rhodium and diamond ring, £10,500, Annoushka. Rosee du matin double row flex diamond bracelet, £7,000, Birks, from Mappin & Webb. iamond and pearl bracelet, price on application, Mikimoto. Blouse, £350, Bella Freud, from Browns. Cards (part of set), £65, Thomas Lyte.

From top: snowflake diamond and akoya pearl necklace, £150,000, Birks. 18-carat rose gold and diamond interlocking bracelet and 18-carat yellow-gold and diamond interlocking, £4,950 each, both Shaun Leane. 18-carat white gold and diamond ring, £26,000, Messika. 18-carat white gold and diamond bracelet, £25,500, Chanel. 18-carat white gold and diamond ring, £32,728, Fabergé, from Harrods. Blazer, £720, Bella Freud. Champagne glass, £75, Lee Broom. Poker chips, price on application, Geoffrey Parker. Dice, £5, Aspinal of London

From top: snowflake diamond and akoya pearl necklace, £150,000, Birks. 18-carat rose gold and diamond interlocking bracelet and 18-carat yellow-gold and diamond interlocking, £4,950 each, both Shaun Leane. 18-carat white gold and diamond ring, £26,000, Messika. 18-carat white gold and diamond bracelet, £25,500, Chanel. 18-carat white gold and diamond ring, £32,728, Fabergé, from Harrods. Blazer, £720, Bella Freud. Champagne glass, £75, Lee Broom. Poker chips, price on application, Geoffrey Parker. Dice, £5, Aspinal of London.

From top: 18-carat white gold, diamond and tourmaline ring, price on application, David Morris, from Harrods. white gold and diamond, opal, sapphire and emerald necklace, price on application, Moussaieff. multi-strand diamond bracelet, £36,850, William & Son. 18-carat white gold and white diamond bangle, price on application, Stephen Webster. 18-carat white gold and diamond ring, price on application, Boucheron. Chess set, £690, Luke Honey. Dress, £580, MaxMara

From top: 18-carat white gold, diamond and tourmaline ring, price on application, David Morris, from Harrods. white gold and diamond, opal, sapphire and emerald necklace, price on application, Moussaieff. multi-strand diamond bracelet, £36,850, William & Son. 18-carat white gold and white diamond bangle, price on application, Stephen Webster. 18-carat white gold and diamond ring, price on application, Boucheron. Chess set, £690, Luke Honey. Dress, £580, MaxMara

Clockwise from top left: 18-carat white gold and diamond ring set, £12,600, Shaun Leane. White gold and diamond double row bracelet, £8,450, De Beers. White gold and diamond link bracelet, price on application, Pomellato. White gold and diamond fringe earrings, £16,000, Mappin & Webb. White gold, aquamarine and pave diamond ring, £8,400, Bulgari. White gold and diamond bow ring, £14,000, and white gold and diamond necklace, £66,600, both Chaumet

Clockwise from top left: 18-carat white gold and diamond ring set, £12,600, Shaun Leane. White gold and diamond double row bracelet, £8,450, De Beers. White gold and diamond link bracelet, price on application, Pomellato. White gold and diamond fringe earrings, £16,000, Mappin & Webb. White gold, aquamarine and pave diamond ring, £8,400, Bulgari. White gold and diamond bow ring, £14,000, and white gold and diamond necklace, £66,600, both Chaumet

From left: platinum and diamond bracelet and platinum and diamond ring, both price on application, Harry Winston. Platinum and diamond collar, price on application, Boodles. Tourmaline and diamond ring, price on application, Garrard. 18-carat white gold, Mother of pearl, diamond and sapphire watch, £96,000, Breguet. Backgammon board, £4,250, Geoffrey Parker

From left: platinum and diamond bracelet and platinum and diamond ring, both price on application, Harry Winston. Platinum and diamond collar, price on application, Boodles. Tourmaline and diamond ring, price on application, Garrard. 18-carat white gold, Mother of pearl, diamond and sapphire watch, £96,000, Breguet. Backgammon board, £4,250, Geoffrey Parker

Photographs Emma Thaler

Styling Bettina Vetter

Fashion assistant Stephanie Sofokleous

Make-up Amy Conley at Stella Creative Artists using Tom Ford Beauty

Nails Kimberley Nkosi using Chanel Le Vernis in Rouge Noir and La Crème Main

Models Dominique and Marta at Established

Producer Lucy Coghlan

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/you/article-5121231/Fashion-diamonds.html#ixzz50rI42PcO
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

Hats off: why the beret is back on the frontline of fashion

The beret is… divisive. I know this first-hand, as I wear them regularly, in black, grey and raspberry. And while much discussion may be found online as to the angle at which one should be worn (pulled forward, or jauntily to the side, or covering your whole head, your hair croissanted up inside), of more help I think is the following tip. The trick to wearing a beret is to avoid eye contact with strangers. Then, when they shout something at you such as, “Bonjour!” (you’re from Hove) or, “Ooh Betty!” (you’re too young to get the reference), it’s far easier to pretend you haven’t noticed and carry on walking. Because in your head you’reMarlene Dietrich, as opposed to “all French people”. You’re Faye Dunaway. You’reDebbie Harry, pretending she’s Patty Hearst, pretending she’s a leftwing terrorist called Tania, with a machine gun and a cosy head. You’re Rembrandt, idiot.

Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty in Bonnie And Clyde, 1967.
Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty in Bonnie And Clyde, 1967. Photograph: Moviestore/REX/Shutterstock

It slides in and out of favour, the beret. The first examples were found by archaeologists in bronze age tombs, with berets also seen on sculptures in 12th-century Europe. Some were bigger, some floppier, but all were made of felt, the oldest form of cloth, created by pressing wool, hard. Shepherds used to fill their shoes with tufts from the sheep; as they worked and sweated, felt was made. Berets were adopted by peasants, then royalty, then the military, then artists. But in 2002 the market had all but dried up – 40 years earlier there had been 15 beret factories in Oloron-Sainte-Marie (France’s beret capital); by then there was just one. “We suffer from the savagery of fashion,” said Bernard Fargues, head of Beatex, the last beret maker in town. Which means today their luck could be changing. The beret is back.

On Prada’s Autumn/Winter 2017 catwalk in Milan.
On Prada’s Autumn/Winter 2017 catwalk in Milan. Photograph: SIPA/REX/Shutterstock

In Maria Grazia Chiuri’s A/W 17 collection for Dior, every look came topped with a beret – the models were styled as romantic revolutionaries – and Rihanna wore hers in the front row, too. Vogue said the beret is “shaping up to be one of Fall 2017’s most ubiquitous items for gals and guys”. Which of course I applaud. Because there are few accessories as odd as the beret, few that signify conservative uniform as well as revolution and rebellious rock’n’roll. I mean, my dad has a beret. No, he has two, one French, after Picasso, one Spanish, like a Basque separatist. I’ve worn one since I was a child, photographed gazing wistfully out across a reservoir, then at art school, and on days when it rains. I lean towards a beret worn with buoyancy, after Princess Diana, and one fitted snugly, like Eddie Izzard protesting against Brexit.

German actress Marlene Dietrich on the set of Manpower directed by Raoul Walsh in 1941.
German actress Marlene Dietrich on the set of Manpower directed by Raoul Walsh in 1941. Photograph: Sunset Boulevard/Corbis via Getty Images

To list famous beret wearers is to moodboard the entire 20th century: Benny Hill,Audrey Hepburn, Frank Spencer, Ernest Hemingway, Che Guevara. It’s hard to make a list like this and not imagine the dinner party, and the absolute laugh they’d all have. Jean-Paul Sartre, Monica Lewinsky, Johnny Rotten, the Pink Panther, posh schoolgirls, Edith Piaf, the Black Panthers, Beyoncé, mime artists, all of them balancing a nippled plate of felt on their head as if marching off to battle.

A beret is perceived as a hat with power, whether the power to remain poised in a storm or to keep your hair on tight while you change the world. Today, with all that baggage, it is also perceived as a bit mannered. A bit whimsical. For example, a lot of Tesco’s fancy dress costumes come with a small polyester beret. We once bought a beret the size of a Pringle for my late cat (RIP). So, much as I love them, I understand the desire to roll an eye at the sight of one approaching on an urban street. For a hat that can fold up to the size of an Oyster card, this one comes with a lot of crap to carry around. But it’s worth it, as long as you realise that by wearing a beret, you’re always on the frontline.

 

 

DEALMAN

Jeremy Scott is the man fashion loves to hate

Fashion Week is a circus, and no one relishes the big top more than Jeremy Scott.

The designer’s February runway show had fashionistas sweltering in an 80-degree room as they waited for attendee Kylie Jenner to appear, 45 minutes late and with TV crew in tow. Gate-crashers stole seats, relegating top editors from Elle and Teen Vogue to watching a live stream of the presentation in a screening room. Model Gigi Hadid stormed the runway in velvet bell-bottoms emblazoned with the face of Jesus; Anna Cleveland sashayed in a gaudy, Vegas-era Elvis cape.

The industry Web site Fashionista.com called the event a “s – – tshow,” while other critics scoffed at the C-listers, such as Sofia Richie, mugging in the front row. But for Scott, that embrace of chaos, celebrity and kitsch is the whole point.

“I’ve always been inspired by pop culture,” the 42-year-old designer told The Post. “I’ve always been very democratic about my view of fashion and iconography.” As for his haters?
“I would say that they’re stuffy and they could go to another show.”

They do so at their own peril. This Fashion Week marks the 20th anniversary of Scott’s namesake brand — his show on Friday will be a retrospective of his career — and, love him or hate him, his postmodern, cartoon aesthetic is everywhere.

It’s on TV, with Katy Perry and Miley Cyrus strutting in his eye-popping designs at the MTV Video Music Awards. It’s on newsstands, where reality stars are on the cover of Vogue. It’s even on the Paris runway, with revered labels such as Vetements and Gucci splattering images from “Titanic” or Disney cartoons onto their clothes.

 

DEALMAN