Category: Dealman Annoyed Customers Reviews

Five Of Fendi’s Most Memorable Fashion Moments In Film

As the Italian brand opens a new exhibition dedicated to its cinematic history, we look at the costumes they have created for films from The Royal Tenenbaums to The Devil Wears Prada.

The illustrious history of Fendi has long been intertwined with the silver screen: whether through staging fashion shows at Cinecitta or designing costumes for Luchino Visconti and Wes Anderson, the brand is historically embedded in cinematic culture. After all, explained Silvia Fendi in 2013, “the motion picture has always represented an important aspect of our family’s life. I remember, as a child, that the projections were true events: occasions when the movie theatre would enter our house with white background and religious silence.”

That reverence has played out accordingly and now, through a new exhibition entitled Fendi Studios, the brand is revisiting some of its greatest cinematic hits: the pieces that have been custom-created for films including The Royal Tenenbaums and Never Say Never Again. Staged at the house’s new Roman headquarters, it will feature a series of studios with interactive studios, within which visitors can superimpose themselves onto the silver screen alongside its very own Fendi cinema (with a vintage Italian ticket kiosk). In homage, we revisit some of our favourite on-screen Fendi moments, from the outré glamour of Miranda Priestly to fashion favourite Margot Tenenbaum.

Fendi Studios is open until June 2018 at Palazzo Della Civilta Italiana in Rome.

 

The Grand Budapest Hotel, 2014

 

Fendi and Wes Anderson are clearly a match made in heaven – after all, Anderson’s proclivity for mad glamour presents the perfect canvas for a major look. Here, Tilda Swinton (as Madame D) is suitably dressed in a hand-painted velvet cloak, with mink cuff and collars, and she is every bit the fabulously eccentric billionaire.

Never Say Never Again, 1983

 

No matter your gender, surely the staple requirement for being an Eighties Bond villain is a fur coat – and, if you’re Spectre operative and assassin Fatima Blush, such a staple comes custom-made. Played by Playboy covergirl Barbara Carrera, Blush is the archetypal Bond villainess – hyper-sexual and hyper-glam – and her fox fur stole is as necessary a part of her character as her pout.

The Devil Wears Prada, 2006

 

If you’re playing such a stereotypically abusive magazine editor as Miranda Priestly, then you deserve a Cruella-style coat. Accordingly, Patricia Field and Fendi collaborated to create a red Persian jacket with orange and black striped lining for Meryl Streep’s character to wear: an outré fashion statement well-suited to her similarly outré demands.

 

 

 

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Hats off: why the beret is back on the frontline of fashion

The beret is… divisive. I know this first-hand, as I wear them regularly, in black, grey and raspberry. And while much discussion may be found online as to the angle at which one should be worn (pulled forward, or jauntily to the side, or covering your whole head, your hair croissanted up inside), of more help I think is the following tip. The trick to wearing a beret is to avoid eye contact with strangers. Then, when they shout something at you such as, “Bonjour!” (you’re from Hove) or, “Ooh Betty!” (you’re too young to get the reference), it’s far easier to pretend you haven’t noticed and carry on walking. Because in your head you’reMarlene Dietrich, as opposed to “all French people”. You’re Faye Dunaway. You’reDebbie Harry, pretending she’s Patty Hearst, pretending she’s a leftwing terrorist called Tania, with a machine gun and a cosy head. You’re Rembrandt, idiot.

Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty in Bonnie And Clyde, 1967.
Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty in Bonnie And Clyde, 1967. Photograph: Moviestore/REX/Shutterstock

It slides in and out of favour, the beret. The first examples were found by archaeologists in bronze age tombs, with berets also seen on sculptures in 12th-century Europe. Some were bigger, some floppier, but all were made of felt, the oldest form of cloth, created by pressing wool, hard. Shepherds used to fill their shoes with tufts from the sheep; as they worked and sweated, felt was made. Berets were adopted by peasants, then royalty, then the military, then artists. But in 2002 the market had all but dried up – 40 years earlier there had been 15 beret factories in Oloron-Sainte-Marie (France’s beret capital); by then there was just one. “We suffer from the savagery of fashion,” said Bernard Fargues, head of Beatex, the last beret maker in town. Which means today their luck could be changing. The beret is back.

On Prada’s Autumn/Winter 2017 catwalk in Milan.
On Prada’s Autumn/Winter 2017 catwalk in Milan. Photograph: SIPA/REX/Shutterstock

In Maria Grazia Chiuri’s A/W 17 collection for Dior, every look came topped with a beret – the models were styled as romantic revolutionaries – and Rihanna wore hers in the front row, too. Vogue said the beret is “shaping up to be one of Fall 2017’s most ubiquitous items for gals and guys”. Which of course I applaud. Because there are few accessories as odd as the beret, few that signify conservative uniform as well as revolution and rebellious rock’n’roll. I mean, my dad has a beret. No, he has two, one French, after Picasso, one Spanish, like a Basque separatist. I’ve worn one since I was a child, photographed gazing wistfully out across a reservoir, then at art school, and on days when it rains. I lean towards a beret worn with buoyancy, after Princess Diana, and one fitted snugly, like Eddie Izzard protesting against Brexit.

German actress Marlene Dietrich on the set of Manpower directed by Raoul Walsh in 1941.
German actress Marlene Dietrich on the set of Manpower directed by Raoul Walsh in 1941. Photograph: Sunset Boulevard/Corbis via Getty Images

To list famous beret wearers is to moodboard the entire 20th century: Benny Hill,Audrey Hepburn, Frank Spencer, Ernest Hemingway, Che Guevara. It’s hard to make a list like this and not imagine the dinner party, and the absolute laugh they’d all have. Jean-Paul Sartre, Monica Lewinsky, Johnny Rotten, the Pink Panther, posh schoolgirls, Edith Piaf, the Black Panthers, Beyoncé, mime artists, all of them balancing a nippled plate of felt on their head as if marching off to battle.

A beret is perceived as a hat with power, whether the power to remain poised in a storm or to keep your hair on tight while you change the world. Today, with all that baggage, it is also perceived as a bit mannered. A bit whimsical. For example, a lot of Tesco’s fancy dress costumes come with a small polyester beret. We once bought a beret the size of a Pringle for my late cat (RIP). So, much as I love them, I understand the desire to roll an eye at the sight of one approaching on an urban street. For a hat that can fold up to the size of an Oyster card, this one comes with a lot of crap to carry around. But it’s worth it, as long as you realise that by wearing a beret, you’re always on the frontline.

 

 

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Jeremy Scott is the man fashion loves to hate

Fashion Week is a circus, and no one relishes the big top more than Jeremy Scott.

The designer’s February runway show had fashionistas sweltering in an 80-degree room as they waited for attendee Kylie Jenner to appear, 45 minutes late and with TV crew in tow. Gate-crashers stole seats, relegating top editors from Elle and Teen Vogue to watching a live stream of the presentation in a screening room. Model Gigi Hadid stormed the runway in velvet bell-bottoms emblazoned with the face of Jesus; Anna Cleveland sashayed in a gaudy, Vegas-era Elvis cape.

The industry Web site Fashionista.com called the event a “s – – tshow,” while other critics scoffed at the C-listers, such as Sofia Richie, mugging in the front row. But for Scott, that embrace of chaos, celebrity and kitsch is the whole point.

“I’ve always been inspired by pop culture,” the 42-year-old designer told The Post. “I’ve always been very democratic about my view of fashion and iconography.” As for his haters?
“I would say that they’re stuffy and they could go to another show.”

They do so at their own peril. This Fashion Week marks the 20th anniversary of Scott’s namesake brand — his show on Friday will be a retrospective of his career — and, love him or hate him, his postmodern, cartoon aesthetic is everywhere.

It’s on TV, with Katy Perry and Miley Cyrus strutting in his eye-popping designs at the MTV Video Music Awards. It’s on newsstands, where reality stars are on the cover of Vogue. It’s even on the Paris runway, with revered labels such as Vetements and Gucci splattering images from “Titanic” or Disney cartoons onto their clothes.

 

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Meghan Markle style file: the fashion history of Prince Harry’s girlfriend

Having begun her career with small roles in CSI: NY and 90210 – as well as a small stint as a ‘briefcase girl’ on Deal or no DealMeghan Markle shot to fame in 2011 when she was cast as paralegal Rachel Zane in Suits.

Not her only reason for being in the spotlight, however, Markle has also been dating Prince Harry for the last nine months.

Confirming their relationship last November, Harry made an emotional appeal for the couple to be left in peace.

Instructing Kensington Palace to issue a statement on his behalf, Harry called Markle his “girlfriend” and noted that she had been the “subject to a wave of abuse and harassment” including a torrent of racist and sexist slurs by “social media trolls”.

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Previously relatively quiet on the celebrity circuit, Markle met Prince Harry in Toronto in May 2016 during his promotional visit for the Invictus Games. Soon after she was photographed taking her seat in the royal box at Wimbledon.

While she is an ambassador for World Vision Canada as well as an advocate for United Nations Women, Markle’s father is a Hollywood lighting director and her mother a yoga instructor.

And while you may think balancing a role in a hot legal drama alongside humanitarian work would keep the young star busy enough, the star has also shown a keen interest in fashion.

Sitting front row during a number of shows at New York Fashion Week, Markle has shown her support to designers such as Tory Burch, Wes Gordon, Marchesa, Herve Leger and Tracy Reese.

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Blogger Creates Plus-Size Calendar To Celebrate Women Who Feel ‘Isolated From Fashion’

A woman has decided to challenge stereotypical fashion calendars, which she says typically exclude plus-size models, and create her own version with 18 women from across America.

Brianna McDonnell, who is a plus-size fashion blogger at The B Word, aims to “empower body confidence in women through fashion and fashion imagery” after her own childhood experiences left her feeling excluded.

The Los Angeles-based model told HuffPost UK: “As a young girl I was obsessed with the fantasy of fashion editorial magazines, but felt isolated from fashion because of my size.”

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Starting her own blogging platform in 2015, it wasn’t long before McDonnell decided to start her ‘Be In Your Skin’ movement, which encourages a more body-positive attitude in young females.

This movement then gave way to the idea of a calendar.

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McDonnell said: “[It was] not only to honour the legacy of editorial fashion calendars but to create a space where plus-size women could be seen in an editorial, artful, sexy and represented way.”

She has been working on the 2018 edition of the calendar for six months with her favourite plus-size bloggers, models and influencers.

“The #BEinyourskin Plus Size Editorial Wall Calendar is a celebration, it’s a daily reminder that plus-size, fat, curvy, thick, chunky bodies are good bodies and can be seen in an artful, editorial, fashion way,” said McDonnell.

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Singaporean comes out as transgender individual through love for Lolita fashion

There’s a small “Lolita” fashion community in Singapore made up of about 100 members – and one of whom is a transgender individual.

Location sound recordist Kerraine, 36, told Yahoo Lifestyle Singapore during a recent interview that she had decided to come out as a transgender woman in 2016, the year she began her journey to becoming an avid fan of the kawaii and feminine cult fashion that originated in Japan.

Kerraine, who was born male and hasn’t gone through gender reassignment, bought her first Lolita-styled clothing in January 2016 from popular Chinese e-marketplace Taobao. Her first buy was a grey jumper skirt made of wool. Today, Kerraine, who shops at least twice a month, owns 20 pairs of tights, three over-the-knee socks, 11 jumper skirts, a one-piece dress, several hair wigs and a puffy petticoat that will give her that signature A-line or “cupcake” silhouette many Lolita fans aim for. The Lolita look is a combination of cute and elements of fashion from the Victorian and Rococo era.

“I love that it’s cute, it’s feminine and very modest-looking. For many Lolita dressing, the silhouette stands out the most and I like that,” gushed Kerraine, who also thinks that the Lolita look helps to add “curves” to her “skinny” figure.

Kerraine’s favourite Lolita styles include classic and sweet. Other styles available for Lolita fans to experiment with are, country, gothic, Wa-Loli (has elements of traditional Japanese fashion), Qi-Loli (has elements of traditional Chinese fashion) and steampunk, a style inspired by science fiction.

Kerraine, 36, has come out as a transgender individual through her love for Lolita fashion. This photo was taken during a recent photo shoot at Taiwan-based Flora Salon. (Photo: Kerraine/Flora Salon)

Members of the local Lolita fashion community attend meet-ups – commonly known as tea gatherings – during which members discuss outfits, styles and shopping, among others. However, due to her unpredictable working schedule, Kerraine hasn’t been able to participate much.

During some of these tea gatherings, members can also meet up to swap or give away clothing or accessories. For the ones organised by local event planner Haru House, members are encouraged to join “meet and swap” tea gatherings as a means to “cut wastage and save money on buying new stuff”, according to their Facebook page.

Lolita fashion can be a very expensive hobby, admits Kerraine, who was dressed in a classic-style Lolita fashion during this interview.

“I have spent so much in the last year just on clothes and accessories,” said Kerraine guiltily before she went on to take this reporter through the estimated cost of every single thing she was wearing – starting from her hair accessory.

“This is $20, the wig is $45, the blouse is $75, the jumper skirt is $350, the petticoat is $40, the tights $2 and the high-heeled leather boots $200,” said Kerraine.

Kerraine later whipped out her latest purchase, a pair of cupcake-themed high-heeled shoes from British brand Irregular Choice, which she pointed out was not a common brand for Lolita fans but it “shows that you don’t necessarily need to stick to popular Lolita brands to pull off the look”.

Kerraine, 36, posing with one of the wigs she bought from Taiwanese brand Dream Holic. (Photo: Nurul Azliah/ Yahoo Lifestyle Singapore)

A number of popular Lolita brands Kerraine usually shops from are Mary Magdalene and Innocent World from Japan. She also checks out secondhand online marketplace Lace Market, where people can buy, sell or trade their items. For wigs, she prefers Taiwan-based brand Dream Holic.

 

 

 

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Joy of unisex: the rise of gender-neutral clothing

Is John Lewis at the frontline of modern gender politics? It has never seemed so before, but judging by the reaction to the department store’s announcement last week that its own-brand children’s clothes will no longer be divided by gender, some people clearly see the retailer as radical. There will now be no separate sections in the stores, nor such binary labels on the clothes themselves; instead, the labels will read “girls and boys” or “boys and girls”.

The conversation over whether clothing should be more gender-neutral does not just apply to childrenswear – over the past decade there has also been a marked rise in gender-neutral clothing for adults. Some high-end designers such as JW Anderson, Rick Owens and Rad Hourani have championed gender-neutral clothing, while a raft of smaller companies run by young designers, such as Rich Mnisi, are pushing the idea that men’s and women’s clothes should be obsolete categories. This approach has also filtered down to the high street – H&M and Zara have both created non-gendered ranges.

The British designer Katharine Hamnett has a long history of exploring non-gender-specific clothing, and her newly reissued collection features unisex shirts, sweatshirts and silk all-in-one suits. She says that, in the past, when women stepped on to more traditionally male sartorial territory – wearing military-inspired clothing, for instance – this “was about appropriating male power”. Now, she says, a move towards equality means women “may be feeling more comfortable with themselves”; in other words, they may have the freedom to wear what they like. (It is still far less common for men to seek out traditionally female clothing.)

Clothing by Gender Free World.
Clothing by Gender Free World.

Chloe Crowe, brand manager for Bethnals, a London-based unisex denim brand, says that when they have run pop-up shops, men and women in couples have come in and bought jeans that they can share. The company was launched in 2014 by Melissa Clement, a former senior denim buyer for Topshop, who borrowed her partner’s clothes a lot and wondered why men’s and women’s categories had to be different. The core styles of her brand – skinny, straight and relaxed – are cut the same for men and women. “It’s just clever pattern cutting,” says Crowe. “With denim, it can vary so much depending on your body shape. One woman is not going to [fit in] the same pair of jeans as another woman. I think it makes things a lot more simplistic, and it’s about the style and design rather than your sex.”

Clothing by Gender Free World.
Pinterest
Clothing by Gender Free World.

The growth of the brand follows more awareness and discussion around gender fluidity and what it means to reject the male/female binary. A study for the Fawcett Society last year found that 68% of young people believe gender is non-binary. “When Bethnals lauched, there wasn’t a lot [about gender],” says Crowe. “More brands have released gender-neutral clothing. It has filtered its way to the mass market. There seems to be a huge demand for it.”

“You don’t look at food and say it’s going to be eaten by a man or a woman, so why should it be any different for clothes?” saysTanmay Saxena, founder and designer of LaneFortyfive. The clothing Saxena designs is mostly bespoke tailoring, including shirts and waistcoats; about 60% of his customers are women. The clothes are the same styles for men and women, in the same fabrics, and while the shirts and smocks are cut the same, only the fit for trousers is slightly different.

He has been working on the label for about three years, but formally launched it last year. “I couldn’t find clothes that suited my own style. The basic idea was I would make something that I can wear but at the same time, it has to be irrespective of gender. That idea was always in my head.”

The shirt company GFW Clothing – GFW stands for Gender Free World – has three fits, designed to fit different bodies rather than the broad terms “men” or “women”. Lisa Honan co-founded the brand online less than two years ago and opened a shop in Hove earlier this year.

Initially, she says, it was borne out of frustration at not being able to find shirts she liked. “I’d look in the men’s aisle and see great patterns and short-sleeved shirts, and then you’d go to the women’s aisle and they were blousy, they’ve got puffs or are lacy.” The men’s shirts, she says, didn’t fit her “because I’ve got a woman’s body. It got me thinking why is [there] a man’s aisle and a woman’s aisle, and why do you have to make that choice? You’re not able to make many purchases without being forced to define your own gender.”

Will we ever get to the point where we don’t have men’s and women’s sections in shops? “I would love that,” says Honan. “It’s about expressing your style and being able to choose what you want without having to be told that, because of your sexual characteristics, you have to shop in a certain way.”

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