Michael Kors Highlights 36-Year Fashion Career at Met

During “The Atelier With Alina Cho,” Michael Kors discussed the importance of Asia, his new fall ad campaign, having First Lady Melania Trump as a customer and helping to provide millions of meals for the underprivileged.

 

Michael Kors, Alina Cho

and helping to provide millions of meals for the underprivileged.

By Rosemary Feitelberg on June 22, 2017
Michael Kors, Alina Cho

Michael Kors and Alina Cho were interrupted by animal rights activists early on in their discussion Wednesday night at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, but neither was about to let the protesters ruin the night.

One minute the designer was talking about giving his likeness “a cute backside” in a resort print and moments later he was encircled by demonstrators chanting about his use of fur. But Cho and Kors kept their cool. Once order was restored, after a short break, they returned to the stage to discuss his career. After the fact, Kors said of his intrepidness, “Listen, I had the ceiling fall during a runway show and hit Suzy Menkes on the head, and the show went on.”

Kors’ priority is his shoppers. “I always say that I make the frame so that the women who wear the clothes are the picture,” he explained. Here, are a few of the highlights.

The company’s recent decision to close 100 stores
“We all have to remember that nothing is ever going to compete with the rush, the rustle of the tissue paper, the shopping bag — you can’t give that up. We just did a trunk show in Chicago. You’re showing clothes to women who have seen them on their phones. It’s not quite the same thing. It’s a matter of how all of this works together how you shop online on your phone, on your laptop, in a store.”

Giving back with God’s Love We Deliver and the U.N. World Food Program Watch Hunger Stop 
“We live a very fast life in New York. A lot of people are very privileged. I tell everyone, ‘Go deliver a meal. It will change your world.’”

Why is Asia so important to everyone’s business?
“Everyone has to remember the best word in fashion is ‘curiosity,’ so if you have a customer who is excited, inspired, enthused and curious isn’t that the best business opportunity? Now we’ve seen there is less variance from region to region. Maybe we sell more boots in Moscow or more sandals in Singapore, but our customer travels and they actually have a very similar point of view.”

Sizing up Mario Testino’s shots of Edie Campbell in the new fall campaign
“I love that she’s so chic and so bored. What’s amazing though in fashion, a lot of people think fashion has to be sad and dour. And it can never be happy or, God forbid, wearable. Mario and I both love joy, energy, luxury and glamour. Sometimes I hear people say, ‘Oh, I’m going to wear that for special occasions.’ I’m like, ‘Your life is a special occasion. Wear your damn beaded dress with a sweatshirt over it.’ Enjoy the things you own.”

His view of the Rei Kawakubo/Comme des Garçons exhibit
“Mind boggling. When you see the breadth of her work, it’s remarkable. Everyone says they wear Comme des Garçons T-shirts or cute sneakers, but then you look at these pieces that certainly were never designed to be worn or packed. I mean packable? It’s not walkable or sittable. Here’s a designer who’s not thinking of that when she’s creating these things. She’s really creating in a very different sphere.”

Walking the red carpet and dressing Kerry Washington for this year’s Met Gala
“Torture — the stairs freak me out. They seem endless. When I talk to celebrities who have walked the red carpet a zillion times, they say they still get nervous. Kerry had just had a baby and I said, ‘You want everyone to see how remarkable the bod is looking….Right before we were about to get into the car, I asked her, ‘Are you wearing commando briefs?’ She said yeah. I said, ‘You’ve got to switch your underwear.’ So we switched everything and sewed her underwear to the dress at the last minute literally on our way. That’s the ultimate couture attention.”

Melania Trump wearing Michael Kors
“She’s been a customer of ours for a long time. What we have to remember is that my favorite customers are opinionated. They know what works on them, what’s right for them….The simple truth is if I do my job well we have customers who are 17 and who are 90, customers who are size zero and size 22. So I don’t think it’s a political thing.”

Securing the largest IPO for a fashion company in 2011
“When I first started in fashion, American fashion was for America. The reality is if you have been doing something for a long time and can still stay curious, that is the greatest thing as a human being. And certainly to do what you love. But I think it says a lot about American fashion and how potent American style is globally.”

Showing off Style: Fashion at the 2017 NBA Draft

 

 

Some Ware’s Paris Fashion Week Debut Featured a Who’s Who of Cool Kids

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brendon Fowler and Cali Thornhill-Dewitt’s latest project, Some Ware, takes cues from the duo’s past in the music world. Thornhill-Dewitt’s no stranger to the march game, having worked with obscure-yet-good Japanese record shop Big Love in Harajuku, a slew of punk and hardcore bands on the West Coast, and of course, Kanye West’s “I Feel Like Pablo” merch. Some Ware began as a music label and nightlife collective in Los Angeles.

“I used to do a band called Barn,” says Fowler. “Cali and I were friends, and then he was supposed to put out a record of mine that I just never finished. But for a couple years we were working on that. And then that kind of led into this.”

Some Ware held its first fashion show in Paris yesterday, with a veritable who’s who of models, ranging from Mitsuhiro Kubo, buyer at Tokyo shop GR8, Tremaine Emory of No Vacancy Inn, Japanese fashion model Kozue Akimoto, and Mark McGinnis of HS-Crown-winning label The Incorporated. It was styled by artist Andrea Longacre-White, whose distorted photography mirrors the distorted graphics of the collection’s fabrics that feature on some of the tees.

Although the searing hot temperatures had attendees sweating to the sounds of Some Ware-signed artists Odwalla 1221, whose debut record just came out on the label. The show featured several street-ready pieces based around singular fits and a cut-and-sew ideology, with plenty of eye-popping graphic sensibilities. Hand-dyed lavender, yellow, and pink long-sleeve tees were emblazoned with text that explained the concept of the show itself, adding a meta moment. The oversized shirts are a new shape that Fowler calls the “New Body,” and are meant to fit boxy. They’re also made from recycled cotton that comes from scraps in their Los Angeles factory.

The same philosophy applies to Some Ware’s workwear-inspired trousers and smock dresses, which are made from deadstock fabric and will similarly only be offered in one size. Some Ware is also releasing a patchwork fabric tote bag. In a way, the collection provides a means for Some Ware to promote itself between records, which Fowler admits can take a while to press.

“We started it to put out the Purity record, which was the record that was playing before the show, a year and a half ago., but it took so long to press the record that in the meantime we started doing all these clothes,” he says. “And crazily enough, we could go fast with clothes.”

 

Fashion Sellers Reel as Amazon Aims at Next Retail Target

A week after upending the grocery business, Amazon.com Inc. is taking aim at fashion.

The e-commerce giant’s latest service, which lets consumers try on items at home before they buy them, prompted a slump in shares of Macy’s Inc. and Nordstrom Inc., as well as European online specialists Zalando SE,Boohoo.com Plc and Asos Plc. It was a rerun of what happened to supermarket shares when Amazon announced a $13.7 billion deal for Whole Foods Market Inc.

The Seattle giant’s Prime Wardrobe service, introduced Tuesday, is “another potential nail in the coffin for the department-store sector,” Wells Fargo analyst Ike Boruchow said in a note.

Amazon is ramping up its fashion offering after expanding its beachhead in physical retailing by gaining more than 400 Whole Foods stores. The move comes as apparel companies ranging from Ralph Lauren Corp. in the U.S. to Next Plc in the U.K. struggle to keep up with fickle consumers and online competition heats up with new investments by fashion chains like Inditex SA’s Zara and Hennes & Mauritz AB.

Amazon may also begin selling Nike shoes directly through its site, according to a person familiar with the situation. The prospect sent shoe-retailer stocks tumbling, with Foot Locker Inc. plunging as much as 11 percent, Finish Line Inc. 5.9 percent, and Dick’s Sporting Goods Inc. more than 9 percent on Wednesday. European sellers Sports Direct International Plc and JD Sports Fashion Plc were down less than 1 percent each in early trading Thursday.

 

Prime Wardrobe aims to eliminate one of the major drawbacks of online clothing shopping — the moment when customers realize they’ll never be able to squeeze into those new jeans that looked great on a website. Shoppers have been able to get around that hassle by buying several pairs in different sizes, but that means having to return those that are too big or small for a refund.

Adidas, A&F

Asos, which fell as much as 4.8 percent Wednesday, could be one of the most exposed because of its “thinly spread global network,” Credit Suisse analyst Simon Irwin said in a note. The London-based online retailer targets young, price-sensitive consumers with mass-market brands like Adidas and Abercrombie & Fitch, a market that Amazon could take on with its global heft.

“The competition will feel Amazon’s move,” said Matthias Hanke, a consultant at Roland Berger. “Especially in the lower and medium-priced segment, retailers and brands without a polished strategy to sell through all channels will have a harder time making money in the future.”

Berlin-based Zalando fell as much as 6.1 percent Wednesday before bouncing back. The company’s fashion focus, underlined with magazine-style editorial photo spreads and commentary, has given it a competitive advantage over more general online retailers so far.

“Fast fashion is not an easy category for brands to sell on Amazon‎ as brands have to pay a lot or earn their way to achieve a prominent position on Amazon but this doesn’t work so well with fast-turn products,” RBC Capital Markets analyst Richard Chamberlain said by email.

Zalando, Asos and Boohoo.com, which targets young women by speeding designs from fashion runways to its online outlets, all reached record highs in early June. Zalando, with a 1 percent share of the European fashion market, has said profit margins may shrink this year as it spends on countering slowing customer growth.

Online fashion retailers in Europe are already facing increasing competition from bricks-and-mortar incumbents such as Spain’s Inditex, which offers online sales in 43 countries, while Sweden’s H&M sells on the web in more than 30.

New Services

Competition is heating up at the luxury end of e-commerce with a newmshopping website from LVMH and a partnership between online retailerFarfetch UK Ltd. and Vogue magazine publisher Conde Nast. China’s JD.com Inc. on Thursday said it had acquired a stake in Farfetch for $397 million.

For now, Amazon is testing Prime Wardrobe in the U.S., where some European online players like Asos have made incursions but apparel e-commerce has been dominated by the websites of department-store chains like Nordstrom.

For department stores, Amazon’s new service is a big threat because users “gain access to a broad assortment of real brands, presumably broader than any single department store in one place, at an already familiar point of sale, with minimal friction and free delivery and returns,” Boruchow wrote.

 

Designs on Paris for Adelaide Fashion Festival designer Cristina Tridente’s new collection

The Adelaide designer will officially launch the 12-piece collection at this year’s Adelaide Fashion Festival, which runs October 11 to 15.

Model Romaine Aiassa in Cristina Tridente’s brocade jumpsuit in Paris. Picture: Weronika Mamot

In the lead up, Ms Tridente is giving The Advertiser an exclusive first look at one of her campaign images.

As the first South Australian to be accepted into London’s prestigious Central Saint Martins, Ms Tridente will complete an intensive course there next month.

In the lead-up she is exploring Europe and, earlier this month, met fashion photographer Weronika Mamot in Paris.

Polish-born Ms Mamot, who lives in Adelaide and travelled to France especially for the couture+love+madness project, took a series of photographs to showcase the collection.

They include a stunning image of model Romaine Aiassa, from Paris agency Jana Hernette.

Wearing a couture+love+madness brocade jumpsuit with a detachable skirt, she is holding a golden flower handcrafted from aluminium by Ms Tridente.

“It’s a modern take on bridal,” Ms Tridente said, adding the Eiffel Tower in the distance provided the perfect backdrop.

“The collection has a Parisienne feel.’’

The Adelaide designer will officially launch the 12-piece collection at this year’s Adelaide Fashion Festival, which runs October 11 to 15.

Model Romaine Aiassa in Cristina Tridente’s brocade jumpsuit in Paris. Picture: Weronika Mamot

In the lead up, Ms Tridente is giving The Advertiser an exclusive first look at one of her campaign images.

As the first South Australian to be accepted into London’s prestigious Central Saint Martins, Ms Tridente will complete an intensive course there next month.

In the lead-up she is exploring Europe and, earlier this month, met fashion photographer Weronika Mamot in Paris.

Polish-born Ms Mamot, who lives in Adelaide and travelled to France especially for the couture+love+madness project, took a series of photographs to showcase the collection.

They include a stunning image of model Romaine Aiassa, from Paris agency Jana Hernette.

Wearing a couture+love+madness brocade jumpsuit with a detachable skirt, she is holding a golden flower handcrafted from aluminium by Ms Tridente.

“It’s a modern take on bridal,” Ms Tridente said, adding the Eiffel Tower in the distance provided the perfect backdrop.

“The collection has a Parisienne feel.’’

From Kanye West’s school sports kit to knitting: this week’s fashion trends

French knickers Sunspel’s first underwear collection for women is less noir heroine, more vintage exercise gear. Cleanly chic.

Knitting Now has Vogue approval: Christiane Arp, elegant German Vogue editor, is often seen with needles. We’ll have a jumper, please.

Kathryn Hahn as Chris Kraus I Love Dick’s heroine (?) is your autumn fashion inspo: fluffy knits, kick-flare jeans and cardigans.

Eastpak x Ami.
Eastpak x Ami.

Eastpak x Ami Backpacks given a charming twist by Ami’s Alexandre Mattiussi.

The cult jean Top marks for a great name for M.i.h’s new style, and for a raw denim look with the sleek lines of stretch. If that makes no sense, just know this: they look really nice on.

Carpeted walls See the Balenciaga ads. No Insta feed is complete without this as a backdrop RN.

Going down

Raw food diets Dangerous if done for more than six months, apparently. Step away from the carrot sticks.

Doris Day
Photograph: Alamy

Twinset and pearls Swap for pearls on your face, as seen at Gucci. Add a crown and logos for the full effect.

Leg jewellery Are we doing this? No.

Skipping PE With the news that Kanye West could be designing sports uniformsfor a school in California, the prospect of running around the playground looks a lot more stylish.

The Pimple Popper Instead, get your gross-out fix from browsby_liz, waxing guru. Nostrils: something that can’t be unseen.

Native American headdresses and the like Glasto-goers, keep away from the cultural appropriation.

SHOPDEALMAN

Age-approptiate: Should women dress according to their age bracket?

Brigitte Trogneux once again defied the tenets of age-appropriate fashion when she was photographed last weekend breezing through the streets of Le Touquet, proving that women over the age of 40 can wear mini skirts (and ride a bicycle at the same time).

The 64-year-old wife of new French president Emmanuel Macron (and her prodigiously toned legs) has become something of a sensation since she arrived on the world stage this spring. Brazenly baring her arms and legs in sleeveless shift dresses, the former schoolteacher and grandmother-of-seven emerged as a style icon for la femme d’un certain age.

Also strolling around France last week was Jennifer Lopez, photographed in Nice wearing a crop-top and high-waisted culottes.

The 47-year-old’s fetishised abdominal muscles – which really ought to have their own agent at this point – have long been a source of fascination.

J-Lo, queen of the abs22
J-Lo, queen of the abs

Now, as the singer approaches her fifties with a seemingly ageless figure, she has become the poster woman for those who refuse to dress according to their age bracket.

There are two divergent schools of thought on age-appropriate fashion. The first group believes that women of a certain age should embrace mid-heel sensibility and three-quarter-length sleeve propriety.

The other group believes that women shouldn’t be oppressed by the dictatorial style commandments of fashion magazines. They think of Lopez’s abs as a totem of resistance and Helen Mirren’s red bikini as a ‘we will prevail’ rally cry in the great battle against ageing.

So is it a matter of taste, or a question of character? Make-up artist Bobbi Brown, who, at the age of 60, still wears Stan Smith trainers and bomber jackets, observed: “If a 45-year-old woman feels like sneakers or pink hair really speak to her personal style, she is going to go for it, regardless of her age.”

In other words, women shouldn’t dress to reflect something as arbitrary as chronological age; rather they should dress in a way that reflects their lifestyle.

It’s a fair point when you take someone like Vivienne Westwood as an example. At 76, the fashion designer can still get away with fluoro orange hair because she’s an anti-establishment activist. The same style would be at odds with a lifestyle of charity bake sales, book clubs and pension plans.

Similarly, fashion experts often advise women over the age of 40 to avoid sequins, but perhaps we should consider the statement of intent rather than the fashion statement.

Razzle-dazzle embellishment looks terrific on women who have every intention of seeing it sparkle under a disco ball (case in point: Kate Moss), but less so on women who prefer to sit it out on the sidelines eating mini sausage rolls at the office Christmas party. As for playsuits, the clue is in the name.

Of course, there’s also the small matter of changing body shapes. Some women overcome this phase by watching every morsel that passes their lips while investing in a wardrobe of smugly-fitted white jeans – think Elle Macpherson, Elizabeth Hurley and Cindy Crawford. The rest of us have to come to terms with the fact that skinny jeans become a health hazard when the top button refuses to close.

Age-appropriate dressing is something of a misnomer given that is has more to do more with attitude (and brute perseverance) than anything else, but there are still a few hard and fast rules worth taking on board:

* Polyester

The high-sheen polyester content of inexpensive, buy-it-on-your-lunchbreak fashion becomes more obvious after the age of 30. Nobody knows why this is.

* Heavy make-up

There comes a point in every woman’s life when black eyeliner has to be swapped for brown and Double Wear has to be dumped. It just makes you look older.

* Prairie dresses

In your head you look like a flirty little ‘first you have to catch me’ forest nymph. In reality, you look like you’re pregnant.

* Boob tubes

It becomes a simple matter of engineering after a certain age. Cameron Diaz said she gave them up when she turned 40.

* Over-the-knee boots

Perfectly acceptable if you’re 5’10” or over. Any shorter and you’ll look like the lovechild of Dick Whittington and Peggy Mitchell.

* Denim shorts

Not denim shorts per se, rather shorts tight enough to cause urinary tract infections and road accidents.

* ‘Still got it’ syndrome

Wear your daughter’s clothing if it suits you, not because you can still fit into it.

* Pigtails

This really should be self-explanatory, but sporting pigtails beyond the age of 12 will make you look like Baby Spice, or the type of woman who collects miniatures as a hobby.

SHOPDEAL